[Withdrawn] Improving school attendance: support for schools and local authorities (2022)

[Withdrawn] Improving school attendance: support for schools and local authorities (1)

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This publication is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-attendance/framework-for-securing-full-attendance-actions-for-schools-and-local-authorities

Overview

This document gives guidance to schools and local authorities to support them to improve school attendance.

The first part of this document sets out the principles underpinning an effective whole school strategy for attendance.

The second part of this document outlines actions that school staff and local authorities may consider taking to improve attendance for all pupils, pupils at risk of persistent absence and pupils who are persistently absent (PA).

(Video) Local Authority School Attendance Support Team: Communication and Advice

This guidance has been informed by:

  • our engagement with schools who have significantly reduced their persistent absence levels
  • teachers’ standards
  • Ofsted’s school inspection handbook
  • other DfE statutory and non-statutory guidance

Principles of an effective whole school attendance strategy

This section sets out the principles underpinning an effective whole school strategy for attendance, which requires commitment from every member of the school community.

Leadership and management

1. Offer a clear vision for attendance, underpinned by high expectations and core values, which are communicated to and understood by staff, pupils and families.

2. Make sure staff, pupils and families understand that absence from school is a potential safeguarding risk and understand their role in keeping children safe.

3. Expect good attendance and punctuality from all members of the school community and make sure that pupils understand its importance.

4. Convey clear messages about how absence affects attainment, wellbeing and wider outcomes. Empower staff to take responsibility for attendance.

5. Recognise attendance as an important area of school improvement. Make sure it is resourced appropriately (including through effective use of pupil premium funding) to create, build and maintain systems and performance.

6. Have a designated attendance champion in the senior leadership team with clearly assigned responsibilities which are identified within the attendance policy, escalation of procedures and school improvement plan.

7. Make sure staff receive professional development and support to deploy attendance systems effectively.

8. Governors should have an accurate view of school attendance and engage in escalation procedures where appropriate.

Relationships and communication

1. Build respectful relationships with staff, pupils, families and other stakeholders in order to secure their trust and engagement. Make sure there is a welcoming and positive culture across the school.

2. Communicate openly and honestly with staff, pupils and families about their expectations of school life and performance so that they understand what to expect and what is expected of them.

3. Liaise with other agencies working with pupils and their families to support attendance, for example, where a young person has a social worker or is otherwise vulnerable.

(Video) Attendance support team – working with families to remove out of school barriers

4. Model respectful relationships and appropriate communication for staff and pupils. This will help relationships between pupils and staff to reflect a positive and respectful culture. All staff members should:

  • treat pupils with dignity, build relationships rooted in mutual respect and observe proper boundaries
  • take into consideration the vulnerability of some pupils and the ways in which this might contribute to absence, handling confidential information sensitively
  • understand the importance of school as a place of safety where pupils can enjoy trusted relationships with staff and pupils particularly for children with a social worker and those who have experienced adversity
  • communicate effectively with families regarding pupils’ attendance and well-being

5. Parents and carers should:

  • treat staff with respect
  • actively support the work of the school
  • call on staff for help when they need it
  • communicate as early as possible circumstances which may affect absence or require support

Systems and data

1. Use clear and consistently applied systems and processes to improve, reward and incentivise attendance and address absences. Make sure these systems are inclusive and appropriate for all pupils.

2. Make sure escalation procedures to address absence are initiated proactively, understood by pupils and families, implemented consistently and their impact reviewed regularly.

3. Every member of staff should know and understand their responsibilities for attendance.

4. Robust school systems provide useful data at cohort, group and individual pupil level to give an accurate view of attendance, reasons for absence and patterns amongst groups such as:

  • children who have a social worker including looked-after children
  • young carers
  • children who are eligible for free school meals
  • children who speak English as a second language
  • children who have special educational needs and disabilities

5. Monitor and analyse attendance data regularly to allow early intervention to address issues. This includes raising concerns with other agencies like children’s social care and early help services which are working with families.

6. Attendance leaders may consider providing regular reports to staff across the school to enable them to track the attendance of pupils and to implement attendance procedures.

7. School attendance, safeguarding and pastoral support policies should clearly outline:

  • the key principles
  • rules pupils need to follow
  • routines
  • consequence systems

8. The escalation of procedures to address absence needs to be:

  • understood by pupils, parents and carers
  • implemented consistently
  • reviewed regularly

Intervention

1. Deliver intervention in a targeted way, in response to data or intelligence.

2. Monitor and analyse attendance data regularly to ensure that intervention is delivered quickly to address absence (register inspections, code analysis, cohort and group monitoring, punctuality, lesson attendance across subjects and benchmarking).

3. Use attendance, pastoral and SEND staff who are skilled in supporting pupils and their families to identify and overcome barriers to attendance.

(Video) School Attendance and Truancy in PA, What the Law Says

4. Create action plans in partnership with families and other agencies that may be supporting families, for example, children’s social care and early help services. Commission or deliver interventions to improve attendance.

5. Monitor the impact of any intervention, making adjustments if necessary and using findings to inform future strategy.

6. Where interventions fail to address attendance issues, identify the reasons why and, where appropriate, change or adjust the intervention.

7. Follow local authority codes of conduct, policies and procedures and make referrals for statutory intervention when interventions have not resulted in improved attendance and relevant triggers / thresholds are met.

Actions for school staff and local authorities to improve attendance

The following sections outline the actions that school staff and local authorities could consider taking to improve attendance for all pupils, pupils at risk of poor attendance and pupils who are persistently absent. You might have different staffing structures and policies, so the designated staff we have used as examples below may not be an exact match. However, the actions we are recommending are relevant to all settings.

Go to information for:

  • school leaders
  • teaching staff and tutors
  • attendance officers, pastoral staff and family support workers
  • local authorities and external partners

School leaders

All pupils

You may want to:

  • deliver clear messages about expectations, routines and consequences to new pupils and families through prospectus and admission/transition events
  • use physical presence to reinforce routines and expectations on arrival and departure
  • regularly communicate expectations for attendance and punctuality and school performance through your regular channels of communication with staff, pupils and parents
  • establish and monitor implementation of rewards for attendance and punctuality and sanctions for absence and lateness
  • monitor implementation of policy and practice, for example through:
    • form time drop in
    • shadow late gate
    • planner checks
  • engage community businesses, partners and residents to promote attendance and report non-attendance
  • monitor whole school data regularly to identify reasons for absence, patterns, attendance of particular groups and the impact of interventions
  • establish, implement and monitor robust arrangements to identify, report and support children missing education (CME)
  • develop good support for children with medical conditions (including the use of individual healthcare plans), mental health problems and special educational needs (SEND)
  • engage pupils in consultation on attendance policy, practice, rewards and sanctions
  • ensure that parents fully understand the demands and responsibilities of elective home education

Pupils at risk of persistent absence

You may want to:

  • establish robust escalation procedures which are initiated before absence becomes a problem, for example by:
    • sending letters to parents and carers
    • having a weekly tutor review
    • creating attendance clinics
    • engaging with local authority attendance teams and/or independent attendance organisations
    • using fixed penalty notices
    • engaging with children’s social care staff, including Virtual School Heads and social workers where appropriate
  • establish a range of evidence-based interventions to address barriers to attendance
  • monitor the implementation and quality of escalation procedures (and intervention), for example:
    • having a review and clinic drop in
    • sampling of case files
  • evaluate the impact of escalation procedures and seek robust evidence of the escalation procedures that work and that reflect the school context best
  • attend or lead on attendance reviews and clinics in line with escalation procedures
  • engage governors in attendance panels to reinforce messages and outline relevance in terms of training and employment.

Pupils who are persistently absent

You may want to:

  • establish clear and effective service level agreements with external partners to support pupils with persistent absence, including:
    • local authority education welfare and attendance services
    • independent attendance organisations
    • alternative providers
    • youth services
    • school nursing and mental health professionals
    • children’s social care staff where appropriate
  • establish good relationships with a network of voluntary organisations and charities to support vulnerable pupils including those with persistent absence, for example:
    • mental health charities
    • mentoring organisations
    • young carers association
  • engage in or lead on attendance reviews and clinics in line with escalation procedures

Teaching staff and tutors

All pupils

You may want to:

  • rehearse and reinforce attendance and punctuality expectations continually
  • emphasise the importance of attendance and its impact on attainment
  • promote the next lesson and the sequence of the lesson to motivate pupils to be in the classroom
  • promote rewards and celebrate progress but continue to outline sanctions
  • apply rewards and sanctions consistently
  • follow up on absence and lateness with pupils to identify barriers and reasons for absence
  • contact parents and carers regarding absence and punctuality
  • review form or tutor group attendance weekly to share data, identify issues, intervene early and help set targets
  • periodically review practice and consistency both across and between departments
  • proactively promote attendance practice as part of staff induction
  • consider the individual needs and vulnerabilities of pupils

Pupils at risk of persistent absence

You may want to:

  • welcome pupils back following an absence and provide good catch up support to build confidence and bridge gaps. This could include:
    • lesson resources
    • buddy support
    • one to one input
  • meet with pupils to discuss absence, patterns, barriers and problems
  • establish action plans to remove barriers, provide additional support and set targets. This could include:
    • lunchtime arrangements
    • support with uniform, transport, wake up routines or emotional wellbeing
  • lead daily or weekly check-ins to review progress and the impact of support
  • make regular contact with families to discuss progress
  • consider what support for re-engagement might be needed, including for vulnerable groups

Pupils who are persistently absent

You may want to:

  • prepare supporting resources to ensure pupils can access learning when they return
  • develop targeted intervention to address gaps and build pupils’ confidence (including considering small group additional support)
  • contribute to action plans which attendance staff draw together where appropriate
  • provide tailored praise and encouragement when pupils attend and arrive on time

Attendance officers, pastoral staff and family support workers

All pupils

You may want to:

(Video) Using Attendance Data for Decisionmaking: Strategies for State and Local Education Agencies

  • engage with feeder schools or organisations to access absence information in order to identify target cohorts prior to transfer, including mid-year transfers and managed moves
  • provide appropriate support and challenge to establish good registration practice
  • carry out robust first-day calling procedures including priority routine for vulnerable children including children with a social worker
  • undertake home visits in line with your policy to engage families and ensure children are safe
  • identify and, where possible, mitigate potential barriers to good attendance in liaison with families and relevant support agencies
  • implement punctuality routines such as late gate or sign in procedures
  • implement children missing education (CME) procedures when appropriate
  • ensure that that parents fully understand the demands and responsibilities of elective home education (EHE)
  • where pupils have additional vulnerabilities which may require multi-agency meetings try to arrange those meetings outside of lesson time, where possible

Pupils at risk of persistent absence

You may want to:

  • provide regular attendance reports to tutors to facilitate weekly reviews with leaders (including special educational needs coordinators, designated safeguarding leads and pupil premium leads) for monitoring and evaluation purposes
  • initiate and oversee the administration of absence procedures. This could include:
    • letters home
    • attendance clinics
    • engagement with local authorities and other external agencies and partners
    • work with families and the community to identify which methods of communication work best, recognising potential barriers in hard to reach families and find methods that work and are understood
    • consideration if further interventions are required in line with the statutory guidance on parental responsibility measures
  • provide regular reports to leaders on the at-risk cohort
  • provide regular reports/caseloads to local authority attendance team or independent attendance organisations to raise awareness of emerging at-risk pupils

Pupils who are persistently absent

You may want to:

  • develop and implement persistent absence action plans with pupils and families which address barriers and help establish positive attendance routines
  • identify tailored intervention which meets the needs of the pupil, for example:
    • mentoring
    • careers advice and guidance input
    • college placement
    • out of hours learning
    • alternative provision where appropriate
  • lead daily or weekly check-ins to review progress and impact of support
  • make regular contact with families to discuss progress
  • hold regular meetings or reviews of caseload with the local authority attendance team, external partners and alternative providers to check on welfare and review progress
  • liaise with school leaders (designated safeguarding, special educational needs coordinator and pastoral leads) on referrals to external agencies and multi-agency assessments
  • coordinate and contribute to multi-agency meetings to review progress and agree on actions
  • work in partnership with local authority attendance team and other agencies to ensure the appropriate use of statutory parental responsibility measures
  • provide regular reports to leaders on the impact of action plans and interventions

Local authorities and external partners

All pupils

Local authorities may want to:

  • monitor and interrogate local and national data, feedback from schools and intelligence from partner agencies to develop an LA wide strategy to improve attendance and monitor impact (including join up with early help, children’s social care and other LA services)
  • monitor and share relevant absence information with schools for specific groups of pupils including those with protected characteristics
  • maintain regular communication and build relationships with school leaders through local networks and forums, to share local and national data, disseminate best practice and respond to intelligence from school leaders
  • use your children’s services team to facilitate community strategies and initiatives, for example:
    • local authority messages on holidays
    • minimise mid-week starts to school term
    • shared agency messages to reinforce attendance
  • engage partners from virtual school, early help and social care teams to ensure that they understand attendance expectations and ensure that the vulnerable cohort they serve are supported to sustain good levels of attendance
  • work closely with local health services and school nursing teams to ensure practitioners understand attendance requirements/responsibilities and work collaboratively with them to link families into the right support
  • connect with targeted services and make full use of VCS partners to understand current service delivery, service pressures and to facilitate appropriate signposting
  • establish and implement robust children missing education (CME) procedures to follow up reports from school and other educational organisations within agreed timescales
  • ensure that parents fully understand the demands and responsibilities of elective home education (EHE)

Virtual School Heads may want to:

  • monitor the attendance of looked-after children
  • set aspirational targets for attendance within personal education plans
  • provide training for designated teachers about their role in promoting the attendance of looked-after and previously looked-after children
  • provide advice and guidance to those services supporting previously looked-after children and their families about promoting and securing good attendance

School nursing teams may provide support to help implement care plans to support the attendance of pupils with healthcare needs.

Pupils at risk of persistent absence

Local authorities may want to have a clear process for how attendance issues should be managed and escalated if unresolved, making clear when to follow different steps of intervention and involving all relevant agencies.

Social workers and family support workers should:

  • convey high expectations for attendance
  • make sure school attendance is prioritised within multi-agency plans
  • in line with local guidance, use children in need or other multi-agency plans to identify barriers to attendance and engage schools and services in providing early intervention support

For looked-after children, Virtual School Heads should ensure personal education plans identify and address any barriers to good attendance.

Pupils who are persistently absent

Local authorities may want to:

  • consider using the full range of Parental Responsibility Measures (including fast track, parenting contracts and parenting orders, education supervision orders, penalty notices, and ultimately prosecution) using supportive measures alongside sanctions to change parental behaviour
  • build relationships with families of persistently absent pupils, and provide practical support to unblock barriers to attendance
  • coordinate strategies and services to ensure that messages on attendance are consistent and that information is shared appropriately

Social workers and family support workers should convey expectations for attendance and support children and families to overcome barriers to attendance

For looked-after children, Virtual School Heads should use personal education plans to identify barriers to attendance and secure appropriate intervention, reviewing regularly to monitor impact.

To help pupils return to school, school nursing teams can also provide support and advice on:

  • attendance routines
  • hospital education provision
  • home tuition
  • medical needs provision

Further resources

Statutory guidance

  • School behaviour and attendance: parental responsibility measures
  • Children missing education
  • Supporting pupils with medical conditions at school
  • Keeping children safe in education
  • Alternative provision
  • Education for children with health needs who cannot attend school
  • School exclusion

Guidance and resources

FAQs

How can we improve attendance in schools? ›

apply rewards and sanctions consistently. follow up on absence and lateness with pupils to identify barriers and reasons for absence. contact parents and carers regarding absence and punctuality. review form or tutor group attendance weekly to share data, identify issues, intervene early and help set targets.

How many Unauthorised absences are allowed from school before a fine? ›

Before a penalty notice is considered, a pupil must have had a minimum of: 5 school days/10 sessions unauthorised absence in a term or. 7 school days/14 sessions unauthorised absence over 2 consecutive terms.

Do you get fined for missing sixth form? ›

If your child misses school without permission or a good reason, the school records this absence as 'unauthorised'. This will affect your child's attendance record and could lead to a fine or even legal action.

How do you manage school attendance? ›

10 strategies to improve student attendance
  1. Track absences in real-time. ...
  2. Connect with students via email & messaging. ...
  3. Keep students' morale high with a good curriculum. ...
  4. Boost personalized learning. ...
  5. Effective timetable scheduling. ...
  6. Give online tests & quizzes. ...
  7. Gather feedback on teaching & courses.
25 Feb 2022

What are the solutions of poor attendance? ›

Studies indicate that flexible work schedules lead to reduced tardiness, absenteeism, and turnover– and higher employee morale. There are many options for flexible schedules, including telecommuting, job sharing, and flex time.

What was the cause of improvement in attendance at school? ›

Answer: mid day meal scheme , in which the food will be provided in schools.

What are exceptional circumstances for school absence? ›

Exceptional leave MAY be: Grandparent or other close relative is seriously ill – and you must leave in an emergency. Significant trauma in the family recently and a holiday will benefit the child – this must be backed up by a doctor's letter.

How much is a fine for taking child out of school? ›

If you take your child out of school without permission, you may receive a penalty notice. If you receive a penalty notice you will have to pay: £60 per parent for each child - if you pay within 21 days. £120 per parent for each child - if you don't pay within 21 days, but do pay within 28 days.

Can parents go to jail for child missing school UK? ›

If it is proved that you knew that your child was not attending school regularly and there is no justifiable reason, the Court may find you guilty of an offence under Section 444 (1) (a) Education Act 1996. In this case a fine of up to £2,500 may be imposed and/or a term of imprisonment not exceeding 3 months.

Can I stay off school with anxiety? ›

You should inform them in advance of any medical appointments or planned treatment. If your child is unable to go to school because of a mental health condition, such as severe anxiety, let the school know in writing, rather than just keeping them at home. A GP's note may help in such cases.

What happens if your child's attendance is low? ›

You have up to 28 days from issue to pay the penalty notice in full, after which we are required to start proceedings in the magistrates' court for the original offence of failing to ensure your child's attendance at school. If proved, this can result in a fine of up to £2,500, plus costs.

How many absences are allowed in a school year UK? ›

Fines are issued for unauthorised absence of 5 or more days and each school day is divided into 2 registration periods. For example, if your child is absent for one day this equals 2 sessions and a five day absence is equal to 10 sessions.

How do you fix school attendance issues? ›

Here are some strategies to improve school attendance:
  1. Make school a welcoming and engaging place.
  2. Connect with at-risk students.
  3. Involve parents.
  4. Award PBIS points for attendance achievements.
  5. Focus on attendance schoolwide.

What are some attendance goals? ›

Set a realistic attendance goal, usually between 2-5% higher than your 3-year average. Attendance can be a difficult metric to move dramatically in one year, as it often requires a great deal of process and cultural change.

What is an attendance improvement plan? ›

The purpose of the Student Attendance Intervention Plan is to identify the reason(s) for a student's truancy, document the previous steps taken by the school to address the student's truancy problem, and develop the plans necessary to improve the student's future attendance.

How do you answer interview question about attendance? ›

Be honest with how many days you've been absent and if you feel it's a higher number than is generally acceptable, consider explaining the reason for your days away from work. Example: "In the past year, I had about five days of unplanned absences.

How do you write a performance improvement plan for attendance? ›

How to Create an Employee Attendance Improvement Plan
  1. Draft an Employee Attendance Policy. ...
  2. Track Attendance Records. ...
  3. Identify The Causes of Absence. ...
  4. Explain The Consequences. ...
  5. Train Supervisors to Deal With Absenteeism. ...
  6. Boost Employee Morale. ...
  7. Allow a Flexible Work Schedule. ...
  8. Provide Employee Counseling.
28 Dec 2020

How can you maintain good attendance? ›

How to Improve My Punctuality and Attendance
  1. Prepare in Advance. Prepare for work the night before. ...
  2. Sleep is Critical. Get enough rest at night as an attendance commitment pledge. ...
  3. Seek an Attendance Commitment Partner. ...
  4. Wellness is Key. ...
  5. Maintain Work-Life Balance.

Why is school attendance so important? ›

Students who attend school regularly have been shown to achieve at higher levels than students who do not have regular attendance. This relationship between attendance and achievement may appear early in a child's school career.

What is the importance of attendance? ›

When students are not frequently absent, their grades and reading skills often improve—even among those students who are struggling in school. Students who frequently attend school feel more connected to their community and develop strong social skills and friendships, which are important life skills.

Why is good attendance important? ›

Regular attendance and punctuality are vital attributes for all employees. It is important for employees to attend work regularly and to arrive at work on time, because failure to do so detrimentally affects employee morale and productivity.

Can I take my child out of school for mental health? ›

Schools are advised to use code I to record illness and guidance is clear that schools should authorise absence due to illness (both physical and mental health related) unless they have genuine cause for concern about the veracity of an illness.

What counts as exceptional circumstances? ›

Defining an 'exceptional circumstance'

serious short-term illness or injury. flare-up of a diagnosed and ongoing illness or disability, including a mental health condition. symptoms of an infectious disease that could be harmful if passed on to others. death or significant illness of a close family member or friend.

How many days off is 90 Attendance UK? ›

90% attendance means that your child is absent from lessons for the equivalent of one half day every week. Over five years this is the equivalent of about one half of a school year.

How many days off is 80 attendance? ›

Well, simple arithmetic says that if you miss one day out of every five, that's a maximum of 80% attendance, which is nowhere near good enough.

What happens if you don't pay a school fine? ›

Failing to pay the fine will result in prosecution and being summoned to appear at the Magistrates Court. Start a criminal investigation which could lead to you being prosecuted in the Magistrates' Court.

How many days can a child miss school? ›

Responsibilities of Schools

Schools are obliged to keep a register of the students attending the school. They must also maintain attendance records for all students and inform the Child and Family Agency's educational welfare services if a child is absent for more than 20 days in a school year.

Can I call the police if my child refuses to go to school? ›

You can call the police if your child refuses to go to school. If they are in a public place, the police can take them back to school. However, if your child is at home, the police can just talk to your child and encourage them to go to school.

Can I call the police if my child refuses to go to school UK? ›

If your child is refusing to go to school, then the police do not have any powers to make them attend. You should speak to the school who will be able to offer support and assistance.

What happens if your child misses too much school UK? ›

Parents can be issued a Fixed Penalty Notice by the Local Authority for their child's non-attendance. The penalty is £60 and this rises to £120 if paid after 21 days but within 28 days. Each Local Authority should publish a 'Code of Conduct' for Fixed Penalty Notices.

Does anxiety count as Sen? ›

Anxiety can be a 'Special Educational Needs & Disability' issue (SEND), as clearly defined in the 'Special Educational Needs Code of Practice', since it is likely to impact on your child's ability to learn if left untreated.

Should I force my anxious child to attend school? ›

Be empathetic but firm that your child or teen must attend school. Tell her you are confident she can face her fears. Let your child know that while physical symptoms of anxiety, such as stomachaches, headaches, and fatigue, are certainly unpleasant, they are not dangerous.

How does mental health affect school attendance? ›

Children and teens whose mental health needs are not addressed, who do not have appropriate coping mechanisms to manage their feelings, or are not getting support may begin to avoid school. As a result, they may struggle with making educational progress and have difficulties building relationships with peers.

What is classed as bad attendance? ›

An attendance rate of 95% is generally considered good; this allows for children to miss 9.5 days across the school year. Persistent absence (PA) is defined as an attendance rate of 90% or below.

Does your attendance restart every year? ›

Attendance is monitored over the entire year and is not reset each term. If your daughter has no further days of then her attendance over the year will rise, and there will not be an issue. Attendance is linked to performance. It is much easier for a pupil to keep up with work covered if they are in class.

Can Camhs help with school refusal? ›

Contact CAMHS early.

Mental health professionals can advocate for your child with the school, but waits can be long, so don't delay.

Can I take my 17 year old out of school for a holiday? ›

No. It is not parents` right to take their children out of school for a holiday. By law, the power for leave to be granted for an annual holiday is discretionary.

How much is the fine for missing school UK? ›

Fine. Your local council can give each parent a fine of £60, which rises to £120 each if you do not pay within 21 days. If you do not pay the fine after 28 days you may be prosecuted for your child's absence from school. Check your local council's rules on when you can be fined.

What are exceptional circumstances for school absence UK? ›

What are exceptional circumstances? Exceptional circumstances are one off events which are unavoidable, examples may include the death of a close relative, attendance at a funeral, respite care of a looked after child, a housing crisis which prevents attendance.

How can we improve attendance in schools? ›

apply rewards and sanctions consistently. follow up on absence and lateness with pupils to identify barriers and reasons for absence. contact parents and carers regarding absence and punctuality. review form or tutor group attendance weekly to share data, identify issues, intervene early and help set targets.

What are the ways to improve student school attendance? ›

Strategies for Success
  1. Create a culture in which all teachers and staff purposefully develop relationships with students. ...
  2. Create a mentor program. ...
  3. Monitor attendance and follow up on students with weak attendance. ...
  4. Minimize obstacles to attendance. ...
  5. Create opportunities for meaningful involvement.

How do you promote good attendance at school? ›

How evaluations will be fed back into policy.
  1. Make use of electronic registration.
  2. Use the correct and appropriate attendance codes.
  3. Make use of the data available.
  4. Have a first day contact system in place.
  5. Raise the profile of attendance.
  6. Involve parents.
  7. Target support.

What are the solutions of poor attendance? ›

Studies indicate that flexible work schedules lead to reduced tardiness, absenteeism, and turnover– and higher employee morale. There are many options for flexible schedules, including telecommuting, job sharing, and flex time.

How do you write a smart attendance goal? ›

SMART goals in the Attendance Plan provide the public with the information needed to understand what is measured and the changes expected through successful implementation of the plan. (SMART: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic/Rewarding, Timely). Identify a goal for Regular Attenders.

What was the cause of improvement in attendance at school? ›

Answer: mid day meal scheme , in which the food will be provided in schools.

How do you write an attendance performance review? ›

Use these sample review phrases to summarize an employee's attendance and punctuality: “Always on time for work, including meetings and conferences” “Has a strong attendance record and is punctual with deliverables required” “Shows up on time for work and completes projects without breaching due dates”

What are the three main factors influencing attendance in the workplace? ›

3 Crucial Factors that Affect Attendance at Work
  • Presenteeism. Presenteeism is when an employee comes to work sick, exhausted, or distracted to the point that they can't carry out their work duties. ...
  • Negative Work Environment. ...
  • Personal Hardships.
9 Nov 2021

How do you write an attendance warning? ›

Dear: Please consider this a letter of warning concerning your continuing attendance problems. Your uneven attendance is beginning to affect other parts of your job, making improvement even more essential. Attendance records indicate that since ___________, you have used a total of ______ days on ______ occasions.

How teachers can improve attendance? ›

Teachers can deliver positive messages about attendance to students and create incentives, ranging from an attendance bulletin board for kindergartners featuring students with the best attendance to high school consistent attendance competitions across homerooms. It's also important to communicate with families.

How do you fix school attendance issues? ›

Here are some strategies to improve school attendance:
  1. Make school a welcoming and engaging place.
  2. Connect with at-risk students.
  3. Involve parents.
  4. Award PBIS points for attendance achievements.
  5. Focus on attendance schoolwide.

What is an attendance improvement plan? ›

The purpose of the Student Attendance Intervention Plan is to identify the reason(s) for a student's truancy, document the previous steps taken by the school to address the student's truancy problem, and develop the plans necessary to improve the student's future attendance.

How can I improve my punctuality and attendance? ›

How to Improve My Punctuality and Attendance
  1. Prepare in Advance. Prepare for work the night before. ...
  2. Sleep is Critical. Get enough rest at night as an attendance commitment pledge. ...
  3. Seek an Attendance Commitment Partner. ...
  4. Wellness is Key. ...
  5. Maintain Work-Life Balance.

How do you support student attendance? ›

Strategies for Success
  1. Create a culture in which all teachers and staff purposefully develop relationships with students. ...
  2. Create a mentor program. ...
  3. Monitor attendance and follow up on students with weak attendance. ...
  4. Minimize obstacles to attendance. ...
  5. Create opportunities for meaningful involvement.

How do you help students with low attendance? ›

Three key strategies

Set positive attendance habits early. Create a welcoming school environment for students. Identify 'at risk' students and intervene early.

How can I improve attendance at work? ›

Common approaches to absence management include:
  1. Taking disciplinary action for excessive absenteeism.
  2. Verifying illness after a specified period of time.
  3. Using PTO banks to help reduce unscheduled leave.
  4. Focusing on personal recognition for employees with positive attendance records and behaviors.

What are some attendance goals? ›

Set a realistic attendance goal, usually between 2-5% higher than your 3-year average. Attendance can be a difficult metric to move dramatically in one year, as it often requires a great deal of process and cultural change.

What is an attendance intervention? ›

Attendance panels are a particularly useful early intervention where a pattern of poor attendance is apparent, whether it is authorised or unauthorised absence. Prior to this intervention it would be expected that school will have addressed early concerns through letters or phone calls to parents.

What happens if your attendance is low in school? ›

warn the students and parents if they are not attending the classes regularly and maintain the records of such students; will inform the parents about the shortage of attendance; schools will recommend the cases as per Examination Bye-Laws only; attendance will be calculated as on 1st January of the Academic session.

How do you write an attendance performance review? ›

Use these sample review phrases to summarize an employee's attendance and punctuality: “Always on time for work, including meetings and conferences” “Has a strong attendance record and is punctual with deliverables required” “Shows up on time for work and completes projects without breaching due dates”

How do you write a corrective action plan for attendance? ›

Here are the steps to write up an employee for attendance:
  1. Gather data. Your write up should include the employee's attendance record. ...
  2. Discuss previous measures taken. ...
  3. Explain the effects. ...
  4. Outline next steps. ...
  5. Ask for feedback. ...
  6. Deliver the write up. ...
  7. File the write up.
26 Apr 2021

What is your attendance smart goal? ›

SMART goals in the Attendance Plan provide the public with the information needed to understand what is measured and the changes expected through successful implementation of the plan. (SMART: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic/Rewarding, Timely).

How do you answer attendance and punctuality? ›

Instead of providing a short answer, consider explaining why you're dependable. Example: "I feel that I'm very dependable. This is mostly because I realize that for any workplace to function as it should, all employees have to show up to work on time and complete their projects by the due date.

What is your opinion on good attendance and work habits? ›

Regular attendance and punctuality are vital attributes for all employees. It is important for employees to attend work regularly and to arrive at work on time, because failure to do so detrimentally affects employee morale and productivity.

What is the importance of attendance? ›

When students are not frequently absent, their grades and reading skills often improve—even among those students who are struggling in school. Students who frequently attend school feel more connected to their community and develop strong social skills and friendships, which are important life skills.

Videos

1. Understanding emotionally based school avoidance seminar
(Anna Freud NCCF)
2. Securing Good Attendance &Tackling Persistent Absence: Department for Education and Ofsted webinar
(Department for Education)
3. School Attendance Guidance Training Webinar - What the new guidance means for schools
(Department for Education)
4. School Attendance Guidance Training Webinar, effective governance that supports stronger attendance
(Department for Education)
5. LIVE! DAILY NEWS | There Will Be Blood
(San Angelo LIVE!)
6. School Attendance Effective Practice Webinar – St Thomas More Catholic Academy
(Department for Education)

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