Joey Lichter, Author at OPEN Foundation (2022)

If you attended university or college and didn’t have an option to take a course on psychedelics – that was because they were practically nonexistent until very recently. Up to the beginning of this century, getting educated about psychedelics meant researching on your own, learning from elders, attending the few conferences that existed, reading available journal articles and books, or maybe joining secret psychedelic societies (in person or on the internet).

But today we are simultaneously experiencing a rise in international psychedelic research and an international acceptance of this field as a genuine, revived field of science. As a result, there is an emergence of university courses. And not just in a few places, but in some very prominent universities.

The psychedelic professors

The relative novelty of this educational endeavor spiked our interest: What are the types of courses offered? How are they organized and taught? What type of students are taking them? And what are the biggest challenges in teaching about psychedelics? We’ve interviewed three professors of current psychedelic courses at prominent research universities, who can rightfully call themselves psychedelic professors: Kim Kuypers (Maastricht, NL), Gianni Glick (Stanford University CA, USA), and Brian Pace (Ohio State University, OH)

Kim Kuypers, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Dr. Kuypers focuses on “Me We Biology”, trying to understand the biology of mental well-being. She researches psychedelics and their effects on cognition, creativity, hormones, and the mechanisms underlying these effects. Dr. Kuypers will be a speaker at this year’s ICPR conference.

Giancarlo “Gianni” Glick, MD, is a 3rd-year psychiatry resident at Stanford whose psychiatric focus is on the interdependence of emotional and physical well-being for his patients. He is also the organizer of the Stanford Psychedelic Science Group.

Brian Pace, PhD, is an affiliate scholar with the Centre for Psychedelic Drug Research and Education in the College of Social Work and a lecturer in the Department of Plant Pathology at The Ohio State University. Trained as an evolutionary ecologist, Brian studied agroecology, climate change, and ethnobotany. He is the Politics and Ecology Editor at the 501c3 psychedelic watchdog Psymposia and is currently a part of the team organizing Psychedemia, an interdisciplinary psychedelics conference scheduled for August of 2022 at Ohio State.

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Here is what they teach, how they teach it, and why it is important they do it.

Q: Which courses on psychedelics do you teach?

A: Kuypers (Maastricht) “Psychedelic Medicine” is an 8-week long elective course for third-year bachelor’s students which is housed in Maastricht’s department of psychology. I also teach a first-year elective course in the same department, called “Drugs in the Brain”. This is for first-year students and is only 4 weeks long. This helps to serve as good preparation for those who will take the psychedelics class.

A: Glick (Stanford) “Introduction to Psychedelic Medicine” is a 10-week course, housed in the department of psychiatry at Stanford Medical School. This semester we have 187 students enrolled. It is an elective course and the make-up is about 70% undergraduates and the rest are graduates of all kinds. We also have many auditors ranging from neuroscience postdocs to attending psychiatrists. This makes for a huge range of expertise and familiarity with psychiatry.

A: Pace (Ohio State) “Psychedelic Studies: Neurobiology, Plants, Fungi, and Society” is a 14-week/one-semester course and it is through the Department of Plant Pathology. The course is for undergraduate bachelor’s students, without any prerequisites, but I frequently have graduate students as well. The majority are third and fourth-year students. There is also a new course being taught in our department called “Psychedelic Bioethics,” taught by my colleague, Dr. Neşe Devenot.

Joey Lichter, Author at OPEN Foundation (1)

Q: What are the key learning outcomes for your students?

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A: Kuypers (Maastricht) I want the students to know about the rich history of psychedelics and to be educated on both the positive and negative aspects of these substances. I place a major focus on how to properly read a scientific article: reviewing the research methodology, analyzing the results, and having a critical mind about it. I see this course as really the first way of getting the students acquainted with psychedelics and from here they should be able to navigate the future research that comes out with a better eye, and maybe also be inclined to get into the research and/or work in psychedelic-assisted therapies themselves.

A: Glick (Stanford)This question keeps me up at night, but I hope for a good cause – there are so many decisions about what to present, how to engage, what sequence of information makes the most sense. Ultimately, I want to prepare students to critically interact with everything they hear in the media and in the scientific literature about psychedelics. This course covers the foundational principles, history, and context for these students to then ask more questions and hopefully contribute to the field of psychedelics, themselves. I think one of the first questions we try to ask is: What does it even mean to call psychedelics medicines? And in doing so understand that we are applying a particular frame to it, specific to this pre-FDA-approval moment in time and space. While it’s nicer pedagogically to stay focused on psychedelics as a medicine, we also tell them that psychedelics can be many other things: sacraments, recreation, and so on. But for this course, we focus on them as medicines.

A: Pace (Ohio State)As the instructor of a course on psychedelics it is my job to prepare students to engage intellectually, become better communicators, and to have better conversations around a controversial topic that is rapidly taking center stage. Frankly, there are a lot of grifters in the psychedelic space, people who are attempting to own the space, and so part of my responsibility is to provide students with tools to critically evaluate psychedelic science and health claims, the job market they may enter, and to hopefully have these students make informed choices.

Joey Lichter, Author at OPEN Foundation (2)

Q: What is the greatest challenge in teaching your course on psychedelics?

A: Kuypers (Maastricht) I haven’t had too many difficulties in teaching this material. I did have an incident where I was teaching about animal research that was done with MDMA to investigate neuronal death, and in doing these studies I discussed the methodology which included decapitation to further look at their brains. As a result of saying so I had a student who left the room because they could not bear to hear this type of work. Though not directly related to in-class learning itself, I have had emails sent to me from parents of children who have abused drugs who question whether I am being too positive about these compounds, even going so far as calling me the devil. But in the 4 years of teaching this course, I have not faced many challenges from students.

A: Glick (Stanford) Trying to figure out – what are the first principles of psychedelic medicine? Where do you start? How to strike a balance between asking big, zoomed-out, philosophical questions of human life and suffering (which I think is what this is really about), while staying in close contact with the data, the practice of medicine, counterpoints to my own views, and a sober take on all of this. How to teach students a kind of big picture schema that new ideas and facts and questions can fit into.

A: Pace (Ohio State) Psychedelics are inherently interdisciplinary. I’m not a psychiatrist. I’m not a social theorist. I’m not a political scientist. Yet these topics are as necessary to address as botanical, mycological, or neurochemical considerations–even though more broadly they may exceed the scope of my expertise. This can be challenging at times, but manageable. What is truly challenging is that issues like colonialism, addiction, and traumatic experiences are discussed in my course, and the reality is that some of the mental health distress faced globally is experienced personally by some of my students. Real injustice never gets easier to talk about, especially with those who are directly impacted by it.

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Joey Lichter, Author at OPEN Foundation (3)

One early psychedelic professor is Dr. Neşe Devenot – now an Affiliate Scholar at the Center for Psychedelic Drug Research and Education at Ohio State University.
She advocated for Psychedelic Studies courses for years, formally so in an essay in 2011 entitled “A Declaration of Psychedelic Studies”. Her first class, “Poetic Vision and the Psychedelic Experience,” ran from 2011 to 2012. A later class called Drug Wars had a focus on psychedelics and featured guest lectures from Matt Johnson and others working in the field. Her “Higher Dimensions in Literature” class in 2014 read McKenna and Castaneda. She went on to teach Psychedelic Studies at the University of Puget Sound from 2015 – 2018.

Q: What pedagogical tools do you use in your course?

A: Kuypers (Maastricht) For both the “Psychedelic Medicine” 8-week course and the 4-week “Drugs of the Mind” course I use Problem Based Learning (PBL). This pedagogy works by bringing real-world problems to the class which functions as vehicles for students to have to look up things they don’t know, synthesize an answer based on their research and these problems are generally guided, often providing one part of a problem at a time. An example of the last PBL assignment was a problem evaluating the positive and negative of the field of psychedelic medicine. In terms of course materials, I developed a course manual and we also use recent research articles for the “Psychedelic Medicine” course. In the 1st year course “Drugs of the Mind” course we use David Nutt’s “Drugs Without the Hot Air”. I do most of the lectures but some of my colleagues help as well. We have a limited amount of time in these courses so we provide additional resources online for students to read and watch on their own.

A: Glick (Stanford) Two years ago the course started as a lecture series, with a different speaker each week presenting on their area of expertise. We updated the second iteration (last year) to have a more coherent through-line and progression of topics, with added small group discussion. And this year we tried to improve that further, so we spent the first third laying the foundational principles, the second third hearing from serious experts in the field (Brian Anderson, Jennifer Mitchell, Robin Carhart-Harris), and the final third weaving everything together. The best session is always the last one when students give 5-minute presentations to the class on any topics or psychedelics subgenres they found interesting. This year they taught us about psychedelics in China, the Eleusinian mysteries, research in psychotic disorders, and a bunch more.

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A: Pace (Ohio State) This is a lecture-based course accompanied by reading articles and watching videos that conclude with 30-minute discussions each class. Since it is a course goal is to get students to have better, evidence-based conversations around psychedelics, students write weekly reading reflections showing that they are considering the material and reflecting on how they feel, and how these topics may connect to their life. Students also do presentations which are evaluated in part by peer review. From day one I am walking students through difficult, yet respectful conversations; you can’t understand psychedelics without touching on topics like consciousness, perception, religious experiences, and criminalization.

Q: What do you believe is the ROLE of university courses in the psychedelic renaissance?

A: Kuypers (Maastricht) It is incredibly important to have these available. I get requests from therapists and psychiatrists who did not get these types of courses in the curriculum of their educational training. Some of them also tell me of the cost for psychedelic-assisted therapy training from private institutions that can cost upwards of 20,000-25,000 Euros, which is crazy. Instead, this type of education should be embedded within all levels of university education from bachelor’s, graduate, and medical education. We definitely need psychedelic-assisted training for therapists in the universities (instead of the private organizations).

A: Glick (Stanford) Similarly to how Johns Hopkins, NYU, and UCLA have stewarded the research through this kind of rigorous academic environment, there is this similar way that universities may offer a credible education, with a kind of peer review process, with a set of checks and balances where you can’t just teach anything. Secondly, doctors should know about this. For medical students and psychiatry residents to be competent about medicines their patients are in some cases already using and that may soon become legal, this should be part of the curriculum.

A: Pace (Ohio State) Psychedelics were abandoned by institutions following the Controlled Substances act in 1970. The new-agey, cultish stuff we see around psychedelics now, with tuning your chakras and merging souls or whatever: that is our fault. That’s an abdication of the responsibility to investigate interesting questions and to chase down data: to find out how things work. So where we are now is a very timid and late re-entry to the subject, more so for education than research. Psychedelic research didn’t end when the universities and governments abandoned it. It continued in the underground. The role of the university courses on psychedelics is to identify and evaluate high-quality information on the topic. We have a lot of catching up to do and I think that should be done with humility.

Joey Lichter, Author at OPEN Foundation (5)

Addendum: The author of this article, Dr. Joey Lichter, is a volunteer for OPEN and ICPR, but also a chemistry professor who teaches a course titled “The Psychedelic Renaissance” at Florida International University in Miami, FL USA, thereby also qualifying as another psychedelic professor.

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If you attended university or college and didn’t have an option to take a course on psychedelics – that was because they were practically nonexistent until very recently. Up to the beginning of this century, getting educated about psychedelics meant researching on your own, learning from elders, attending the few conferences that existed, reading available journal articles and books, or maybe joining secret psychedelic societies (in person or on the internet).

We’ve interviewed three professors of current psychedelic courses at prominent research universities, who can rightfully call themselves psychedelic professors : Kim Kuypers (Maastricht, NL), Gianni Glick (Stanford University CA, USA), and Brian Pace (Ohio State University, OH). Kim Kuypers teaches “Psychedelic Medicine” at Maastricht University to third-year bachelor’s students.. Frankly, there are a lot of grifters in the psychedelic space, people who are attempting to own the space, and so part of my responsibility is to provide students with tools to critically evaluate psychedelic science and health claims, the job market they may enter, and to hopefully have these students make informed choices.. One early psychedelic professor is Dr. Neşe Devenot – now an Affiliate Scholar at the Center for Psychedelic Drug Research and Education at Ohio State University.She advocated for Psychedelic Studies courses for years, formally so in an essay in 2011 entitled “ A Declaration of Psychedelic Studies ”.. Addendum: The author of this article, Dr. Joey Lichter, is a volunteer for OPEN and ICPR , but also a chemistry professor who teaches a course titled “The Psychedelic Renaissance” at Florida International University in Miami, FL USA, thereby also qualifying as another psychedelic professor.. These findings stress the importance of placebo-controlled designs in psychedelic research and the need to further explore the contribution of non-pharmacological factors to the psychedelic experience.. The 20 µg dose of LSD significantly increased ratings of “under the influence,” “good drug effects,” and “bad drug effects.” LSD concentrations dose-proportionally increased at doses as low as 5-20 µg and decreased with a half-life of 3 hours.. A placebo-controlled within-subject study including 24 healthy participants, was conducted to assess the acute effects of three LSD doses (5, 10, and 20 mcg) on measures of cognition, mood, and subjective experience, up until 6 h after administration.. Given the increased interest in using low doses of psychedelics for psychiatric indications and the importance of neuroplasticity in the therapeutic response, this placebo-controlled within-subject study investigated the effect of single low doses of LSD (5, 10, and 20 μg) on circulating BDNF levels in healthy volunteers.. While it is yet unclear whether psychedelic microdosing is of therapeutic value for depression, the aforementioned effects on selective processes suggest that low doses of psychedelics could play a role in depression by inducing some kind of cognitive flexibility, which might lead to decreased rumination.. While previous studies were conducted mostly in small samples of healthy volunteers, future placebo-controlled clinical trials in depressed patients are required to understand the therapeutic value of microdosing psychedelics, how this differs from therapy using full psychedelic doses, and whether different psychedelics have different effect patterns.. Conclusion: The present study provides evidence of a protracted analgesic effect of LSD at a dose that is low enough to avoid a psychedelic experience.. The limited number of experimental studies in healthy people revealed that md has subtle effects on cognitive processes and brain connectivity.
CONCLUSION: The findings of experimental studies in combination with the reports from users give cause for further investigation into the clinical potential of low-dose psychedelics in combating certain symptoms.

There are many documentaries about psychedelics nowadays, but only so little time to watch them all, let alone figure out which one’s are worth it! That’s why we came up with a list of documentaries on psychedelics that you can watch, or binge, comfortably from your own living room. They’re selected for their scientific soundness, cultural insight, or overall high quality.

Leary’s first LSD trip was: “the most extraordinary experience of his life.” Yet to my surprise, he also felt a terrible sense of loss after this trip, as he did not know what to do with these new insights: “Once you see how it is all composed, it is hard to get back to the game.” This experience demonstrates that even psychedelic evangelists as Leary, a very intelligent man who was probably one of the most well-known proponents of psychedelics, would have benefitted from the importance of integration.. According to ICPR speaker Rick Doblin, Huxley’s insights demonstrate where we should put our meaning: “not on consuming, but on something deeper.” Other psychedelic researchers talk about how people ‘wake up’ after their psychedelic experience, including alterations of the perception of the self and various changes in their value system.. It was a revolutionary period for which the famous psychedelic researcher Ralph Metzner said that discovering psychedelics: “was like discovering another continent, like Marco Polo.” Both ICPR speakers Rick Doblin and David Nichols mention how psychedelics are able to occasion a mystical experience and how this helps experience the world as one as it breaks down certain barriers.. Should psychedelic researchers administer psychedelics to themselves?. Michiel van Elk is a Dutch researcher who studies psychedelic, religious, spiritual and mystical experiences and has received a prestigious NWO (government) grant to study the effects of psychedelics.. A psychedelic experience later in life put him on a path towards psychedelic research.. Michiel: I first came across psychedelics about five years ago during a sabbatical at Stanford University, where I met some highly motivated psychedelic researchers.. When it comes to modern research involving psychedelics, this becomes complicated because of the stigma on psychedelic use generally and self-administration by researchers specifically, based on historical examples like Timothy Leary for example.. We’ve interviewed three professors of current psychedelic courses at prominent research universities, who can rightfully call themselves psychedelic professors : Kim Kuypers (Maastricht, NL), Gianni Glick (Stanford University CA, USA), and Brian Pace (Ohio State University, OH). Frankly, there are a lot of grifters in the psychedelic space, people who are attempting to own the space, and so part of my responsibility is to provide students with tools to critically evaluate psychedelic science and health claims, the job market they may enter, and to hopefully have these students make informed choices.. One early psychedelic professor is Dr. Neşe Devenot – now an Affiliate Scholar at the Center for Psychedelic Drug Research and Education at Ohio State University.She advocated for Psychedelic Studies courses for years, formally so in an essay in 2011 entitled “ A Declaration of Psychedelic Studies ”.

  Representatives of Joey’s Foundation are collaborating with Dr. Amy Bastian, Chief Science Officer at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, Maryland.  Dr. Bastian is Director of the Motion Analysis Laboratory and Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Bastian’s team studies a variety of processes, ranging from visual …

Joey’s Foundation is providing statements of problems related to activities of daily living experienced by children with brain injury to Dr. Bastian and to biomedical engineering students from Johns Hopkins University who are engaged in solving problems.. Excellent progress has been made this year by Dr. Bastian’s laboratory at Kennedy Krieger Institute and the Johns Hopkins Biomedical Engineering Design Team to develop an interactive rehabilitation device for toddlers and preschool aged children (i.e., ages 2-5) with mobility disorders.. From their product concept to create a device to help train trunk control and core muscle control, they completed two prototypes of the device, which involve a large interactive surface with custom projection and detection of touch, and wrote custom software for an initial game, Bubble Popping.. For example, the therapist can set the area in which the game is played (e.g. encouraging the child to use the left hand), the difficulty of the game, the theme of game (e.g. bubble popping, animals) and the reward the child receives when hitting the targets based on the child’s personal preference.. Perhaps most importantly, the ADAPT system monitors the child’s progress and compiles an automatically generated session report for the therapist that outlines key statistics on the child’s engagement and movement performance during a session, freeing the therapist from taking detailed measurements during the session and allowing the therapist to focus more on guiding the patient through the exercises.

Ein Lichtarbeiter ist eine Person oder besser eine Seele, die bewusst erkennt, dass sie mit Gott oder dem Universum bzw. der ‚höheren Macht‘ verbunden ist.Sie hat einen starken Drang , sich selbst und der Menschheit zu helfen – auf eine positive Art.Sie folgt diesem Sendungsbewußtsein mehr intuitiv...

Du fühlst sich stark mit der Natur und Umwelt verbunden und glaubst, dass du ihr am nächsten bist, in demdu dich mit dem Universum und deinem Auftrag auseinandersetzt.. Du weißt, dass du für einen höheren Zweck lebst, der direkt mit dem Erwachen und der Veränderung deines eigenen Lebens und des Lebens anderer zusammenhängt, indem du dazu beiträgst, das kollektive Bewusstsein der Menschen zu verbessern.. Du weißt, dass dies nicht dazu gedacht war, dich zu verletzen, sondern um dich zu erwecken und zu dem zu machen, der du heute bist.. Selbst wenn du Lehren oder Prinzipien von einem erleuchteten Meister oder einer Religion anwendest, konzentrierst du dich darauf, das ‚Göttliche‘ in jedem Einzelnen zu erwecken und ihnen zu helfen, ihre unbegrenzten Kräfte, Potenziale und heilenden Fähigkeiten zu sehen.. Du bist in der Lage, deine Wünsche durch extrem starker Manifestation umzusetzen – und du hast auch erlebt, dass du das im Negativen sehr gut kannst.. Wenn du dir etwas klar vorstellst und dich fokussierst, erhälst du das, was du dir vorstellst oder kannst es auch in sehr kurzer Zeit in dein Leben ziehen.. Diese starken Energien sind für dich sowohl ein Segen als auch ein Fluch: Du musst aufpassen, worauf du dich konzentrierst, weil du es letztendlich in deinem Leben erschaffen wirst, egal ob es gut oder schlecht ist.. Du weigerst dich Gespräche ohne Ziel zu führen – wenn du plauderst oder Konversation machst, dann suchst du den Kontakt zu Menschen oder versuchst herauszufinden, wie du ihnen helfen kannst.. Die Liebe ist für dich das Versprechen des Lebens, dein Antrieb, dein Weg und das richtige Vorgehen – und du lebst sie vor.

Description After the events at the Oasis, Company 8 race to contain the chaos. But answers about the Holy Sol Temple and the White-Clad’s tactics may cripple them. Can they unearth the secrets of the Nether before the world is engulfed in flame and ash once more?...

Licht and Shinra come up with a plan to get inside the child pyrokinesis lab where Shinra was institutionalized as a child to uncover some dirt on Haijima.. Licht and Shinra come up with a plan to get inside the child pyrokinesis lab where Shinra was institutionalized as a child to uncover some dirt on Haijima.. The rest of the company meets up with Shinra and Licht, who are facing Kurono, when a third party shows up!. The rest of the company meets up with Shinra and Licht, who are facing Kurono, when a third party shows up!. As Nataku continues to rampage, Shinra Adolla Links with him, revealing the pressure his parents placed on him to succeed.. As Nataku continues to rampage, Shinra Adolla Links with him, revealing the pressure his parents placed on him to succeed.. Shinra and Arthur continue their battle against Dr. Giovanni, who reveals some new information about Adolla Links.. Shinra and Arthur continue their battle against Dr. Giovanni, who reveals some new information about Adolla Links.. Benimaru invites Shinra and Arthur back to the 7th for more training, and Tamaki, tired of being a burden to others, comes along as well.. Benimaru invites Shinra and Arthur back to the 7th for more training, and Tamaki, tired of being a burden to others, comes along as well.. Benimaru continues to push Shinra and Arthur to their limits in order to unlock their Hysterical Strength.. 2 (Original Japanese Version) 2019 Fire Force, Season 2, Pt.. Black Clover, Season 4 2020 No Guns Life, Season 2 2020 Dr. Stone, Season 2 2021 Toilet-bound Hanako-kun 2020 Sorcerous Stabber Orphen: Battle of Kimluck, Season 2 2021 Golden Kamuy, Season 3 2020. Outlaw Star, The Complete Series 1998 South Park, Season 25 2022 South Park, Season 10 2006 South Park, Season 8 2004 South Park, Season 7 2003 South Park, Season 13 (Uncensored) 2009

15.01.2022, 11:54 5 Min. Lesezeit Er ist das Gesicht des Kult-Sendung "Bares für Rares":Horst Lichter feiert seinen 60. Geburtstag. Wie das Multitalent aus einer kleinen Eifelgemeindezum TV-Star wurde. Wann immer man den Horst im Fernsehen sieht glaubt man, ein Wesen aus längst vergang...

Er ist das Gesicht des Kult-Sendung "Bares für Rares":Horst Lichter feiert seinen 60.. "Es ist kein Schmäh, wenn man Horst Lichter den freundlichsten Mann im deutschen Fernsehen nennt", schreibt die Tageszeitung "Stuttgarter Nachrichten" .. Für Lichter sei das so, "als wenn man über Willy Brandt sagen würde, er bliebe den Menschen in Erinnerung, weil er ein guter Gitarrenspieler war".. Das Geld, das er als Koch verdient, reicht hinten und vorne nicht aus.. Er arbeitet nun wie sein Vater in einer Brikettfabrik und nebenbei nach Feierabend noch fünf Tage in der Woche auf einem Schrottplatz.. Er selbst sagt, dass er bis zu 100 Autos besessen habe.. Das war für mich dann das Startzeichen.". Sie arbeitet als Kellnerin in Lichters "Oldiethek" und habe ihre gesamten Ersparnisse zusammengekratzt, damit er seine Schulden abbezahlen konnte.. Lichter!. ", er wirkt mit an der "Küchenschlacht" und bei "Aber bitte mit Sahne".. Er schreibt auch, nicht nur Kochbücher.. Er: "Wenn ich das nicht tue, was gibt's denn dann noch zu sehen, Mutter?". Einen Mann, der dankbar ist für das, "was ich hatte, als dass ich böse dafür wäre, was ich verpassen würde.

CNN CEO Chris Licht has set his executive team, firming up the direct reports who will help run the cable news channel’s global operations.Licht’s appointments are mostly longtime CNN staffers, reflecting a desire to shift CNN’s focus toward hard news, rather than a desire to make dramatic change.“W...

CNN CEO Chris Licht has set his executive team, firming up the direct reports who will help run the cable news channel’s global operations.. Licht also formally announced the addition of two outsiders to his executive team: Washington Post veteran Kristine Coratti Kelly, who earlier on Wednesday was tapped to lead global communications for CNN, and Chris Marlin, a friend of Licht’s who is tasked with leading strategy and business operations, and will be “charged with finding new revenue and optimization opportunities across the business.”. But most of Licht’s team is made up of CNN veterans, including, notably, the three executives who led CNN while Warner Bros. Discoverywas searching for former CNN president Jeff Zucker’s successor.. Michael Bass will remain executive vp programming, and will lead CNN’s daily editorial call; Amy Entelis, will continue to lead talent and content development as executive vp; and Ken Jautz will continue serving as executive vp news, including oversight of operations and production, as well as HLN.. Michael Bass will continue to serve as EVP of Programming for CNN US.. Virginia Moseley will now serve as EVP of Editorial for CNN US, now including the Digital news team managed by Rachel Smolkin.. In this role, Kristine will lead our global communications and brand strategy and oversee our CNN Worldwide PR and communications teams, as well as global marketing.. We also have leaders critical to our mission that are shared across news and sports, including Ellen Russ, who will continue to serve as SVP of People and Culture (HR); Neil Chugani, who will serve as CFO of News & Sports, and David Vigilante, who will continue to serve as EVP and General Counsel for News & Sports.

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